All posts by Meg Zimbeck

SantoPalato

SantoPalato is having a moment. My friends who are traveling to Rome routinely ask about this new trattoria. They’ve heard about it from Katie Parla in pieces from the New York Times or Eater (links below) and want to know if it lives up to the hype.

That hype is significant, but it’s not without substance. Sarah Cicolini is a sincere and gutsy cook who centers her cuisine around the off-cuts known in Rome as quinto quarto. Cicolini has a strong philosophy about using all parts of the animal. If you’re into that, you’re going to have a ball at SantoPalato (maybe literally).
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Emma

There are many potential reasons to celebrate the arrival of Emma Pizzeria in the center of Rome. It’s open every day. It’s spacious, so the chances of snagging an unreserved seat are high. It’s possible to dine outside in good weather. They’re open at lunch, when most pizzerias are shuttered. The quality of wine and deli products is excellent, as one can expect from a place with links to Roscioli. However, the product that’s central to their mission – thin crust Roman style pizza – is disastrously and consistently bad. >>Read More

Da Giggetto restaurant in Rome

Trattoria Da Giggetto

Opinion about this family-run restaurant in the Jewish quarter is strongly divided, and our own experience here has been mixed. If we’re sitting outside in beautiful weather and sipping wine while gazing at the columns of the portico d’Ottavio, it’s hard to find fault with anything in the world. The spell is slightly lifted, however, when we’re dining indoors and not distracted by the spectacular scenery.  >>Read More

Sbanco

Stefano Callegari is considered a trailblazer for his contributions to creative pizza in Rome, and for his invention of the celebrated street snack Trapizzino. After Tondo and Sforno, he opened Sbanco in 2016 in a neighborhood that now includes Epiro and SantoPalato. Sbanco builds on Callegari’s winning formula of tasty pizza + fried starters + nice liquids by incorporating a serious craft beer element. Sbanco is also much closer to the center and near a subway line, ensuring that you don’t need to treat it like a pilgrimage site. >>Read More

L’Osteria di Monteverde

L’Osteria di Monteverde is a fun place. It feels like a neighborhood joint, with walls covered by old maps and album covers, and with a psychotic Ghostface mask waiting to welcome you in the bathroom. Although it was highlighted in a New York Times article about what to do with 36 Hours in Rome, the tables are filled with young Romans, most of them from the neighborhood. >>Read More

Epiro restaurant in Rome | romebymouth.com

Epiro

Epiro is my favorite sort of place – it’s a mom & pop restaurant for the modern age. Alessandra Viscardi and Marco Mattana met in art school but decided that a restaurant was their future. They opened Epiro five years ago in an inexpensive neighborhood just outside of Rome’s center. She manages the dining room and the liquids, he runs the kitchen with Matteo Baldi. Their approach is sincere and personal, and they deliver incredible value for money.

In the beginning, Epiro was a place to try inexpensive creative cooking with a good selection of craft beer and natural wine. It is still that, but the cooking is now on another level.  >>Read More

La Tavola di Oliver Glowig

Rome’s Mercato Centrale at Termini train station has rightly received a lot of attention for its street food offerings from PizzariumTrapizzino and other stands. Not enough attention has been paid to La Tavola di Oliver Glowig, a serene restaurant perched on a mezzanine high above the hubbub. The food is without question some of the most delicious I’ve tasted in Rome, and I keep looking for reasons to return.

I routinely offer to accompany departing friends to this chaotic transport hub under the guise of being a good host, when in reality I can’t stop thinking about Glowig’s cacio e pepe with sea urchin. One time I even stopped for lunch in between changing from one subway line to another. The setting is admittedly strange, but the food keeps calling me back.  >>Read More

Romeo

Back in 2014, I interviewed Cristina Bowerman and featured her restaurant Romeo in an article for the Wall Street Journal about modern chefs setting a new culinary course for Rome. This celebrity chef gained acclaim for her Trastevere restaurant Glass and then opened Romeo in Prati as an effort to bring creative cooking to a wider audience. She eventually shuttered that location (it’s now Osteria Birra del Borgo) and reopened Romeo in Testaccio in 2017.

I find this new incarnation of Romeo to be a selfie-taking, over-the-top and embarrassingly cheesy restaurant. >>Read More

Giulia

There’s a lot to love about Giulia, a new restaurant on the prettiest street in central Rome. The service is lovely. It’s open every day, accepts online reservations, and is right in the middle of where you want to be. They have a young chef, Pierluigi Gallo, who’s just bursting with ideas. It’s not terribly expensive, and there are vegetarian options for every course.

Because Giulia ticks so many boxes, I’m sure to recommend it often. It’s important to note, however, that Pierluigi Gallo isn’t just striving to make a serviceable restaurant, he’s trying to grab a much loftier gastronomic brass ring. He sometimes misses, and usually because he’s attempted too much.  >>Read More